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20/Oct/2021

The “mood swing” phenomenon is a common concept used to describe rapidly and intensely fluctuating emotions. People often describe mood swings as a “roller coaster” of feelings from happiness and contentment to anger, irritability, and even depression. A person may recognize something that has triggered a shift in their mood, such as a stressful event at work. But it’s also not uncommon for mood swings to occur without an obvious cause. People may even experience changes in mood if they have an underlying mental health issue.

CAUSE

Everyone experiences mood swings from time to time, but if you seem to get them frequently or they are so intense that they disrupt your daily life, including work and relationships, it may be a sign of an underlying condition that needs treatment. Internal changes that take place throughout our lives influence our mood, but it’s not just what’s happening inside that determines how we feel; we also respond to what’s happening around us. External changes to our lives and in our environments, such as increased stress at home, school, or work, also can influence our emotions.

ILLNESS AND INJURY

Even though the term “mood swings” implies an emotional root, the shifts also can be associated with chronic diseases or acute injuries that affect the brain, such as dementia, concussion, or a stroke.

  • Diabetes
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Sleep disorders
  • Thyroid disorders

TREATMENT

It is possible to stabilize your mood and improve your health to avoid future changes in mood and emotions. The following treatments for mood changes focus on lifestyle or alternative treatments that you can try at home. Other treatments, including prescription drugs, are sometimes used. 1) Exercise regularly 2) Avoid caffeine, alcohol, and sugar 3) Try calcium supplements 4) Change your diet 5) Practice stress management 6) Sleep better


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20/Oct/2021

Depression (major depressive disorder) is a common and serious medical illness that negatively affects how you feel, the way you think and how you act. Fortunately, it is also treatable. Depression causes feelings of sadness and/or a loss of interest in activities you once enjoyed. It can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems and can decrease your ability to function at work and at home.

Depression symptoms can vary from mild to severe and can include:

  • Feeling sad or having a depressed mood
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in activities once enjoyed
  • Changes in appetite — weight loss or gain unrelated to dieting
  • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
  • Loss of energy or increased fatigue
  • Increase in purposeless physical activity (e.g., inability to sit still, pacing, handwringing) or slowed movements or speech (these actions must be severe enough to be observable by others)
  • Feeling worthless or guilty
  • Difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions
  • Thoughts of death or suicide

Symptoms must last at least two weeks and must represent a change in your previous level of functioning for a diagnosis of depression.

Also, medical conditions (e.g., thyroid problems, a brain tumor or vitamin deficiency) can mimic symptoms of depression so it is important to rule out general medical causes.

Depression affects an estimated one in 15 adults (6.7%) in any given year. And one in six people (16.6%) will experience depression at some time in their life. Depression can occur at any time, but on average, first appears during the late teens to mid-20s. Women are more likely than men to experience depression. Some studies show that one-third of women will experience a major depressive episode in their lifetime. There is a high degree of heritability (approximately 40%) when first-degree relatives (parents/children/siblings) have depression.

Depression is among the most treatable of mental disorders. Between 80% and 90% percent of people with depression eventually respond well to treatment. Almost all patients gain some relief from their symptoms.

Before a diagnosis or treatment, a health professional should conduct a thorough diagnostic evaluation, including an interview and a physical examination. In some cases, a blood test might be done to make sure the depression is not due to a medical condition like a thyroid problem or a vitamin deficiency (reversing the medical cause would alleviate the depression-like symptoms). The evaluation will identify specific symptoms and explore medical and family histories as well as cultural and environmental factors with the goal of arriving at a diagnosis and planning a course of action.


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28/Mar/2021

The Four Parenting Styles

Many experts recognize four parenting styles:
  • Authoritative parents have high expectations and goals for their kids. These are tempered with an understanding of their kids’ limits. These parents are willing to communicate flexibly. This can make parent-child communication easier.
  • Neglectful parenting can mean a lack of time spent with the child. Neglectful parents may be unfamiliar with their kids’ teachers and friends. They may not care for their kids’ basic needs.
  • Permissive parents are nurturing, loving, and supportive. But they can take this too far. Permissive parents may avoid conflict at any cost. They rarely enforce their own rules. Doing this can be harmful for children, as they thrive on routine.
  • Authoritarian is not the same as authoritative parenting. Authoritarian parents are strict and demanding with their children. Their parenting style is not often flexible. They generally rely on punishment to maintain obedience. There is rarely room for open communication between parents and kids.

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27/Mar/2021

Mental Health Statistics of Children

Almost 4 million children may experience mental health issues. These can cause difficulties at home, school, or with friends. One study estimates the rates for some conditions in children and teens:
  • ADHD: 6.8%
  • Behavioral conditions: 3.5%
  • Anxiety: 3%
  • Depression: 2%
  • Autism: 1.1%

Signs of Mental Health Issues or Psychological Distress  among Children

  • Unprovoked aggression
  • Leakage of urine
  • Difficulty adjusting to social situations
  • Recurrent nightmares, night terrors, and/or sleep difficulties like insomnia
  • Low grades or a sudden academic decline
  • Constant worry and anxiety
  • Social withdrawal from activities your child once liked or loved to do
  • A noticeable and/or sudden loss of appetite and/or extreme weight loss
  • Repetitively performing rituals and routines like hand-washing
  • Suicidal ideations (thoughts) or attempts
  • Your child responds to voices he/she hears in his/her head
  • Spending most of his/her time alone or engaging in voluntary social isolation
  • Alcohol and/or drug use, abuse, or addiction
  • Increased physical complaints, despite a healthy report from a medical professional
  • Engaging in self-harm practices, such as cutting oneself



MY MIND, MY CARE





MY MIND MY CARE